"Harsh Realities" Finds Transgender Youth Face Extreme Harassment in School

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Posted

NEW YORK, March 17, 2009 - Transgender youth face extremely high levels of victimization in school, even more so than their non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual peers. But they are also more likely to speak out about LGBT issues in the classroom, according to Harsh Realities: The Experiences of Transgender Youth in Our Nation's Schools, the first comprehensive study on transgender students, released today by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network.

Nearly nine out of 10 transgender students experienced verbal harassment at school in the past year because of their sexual orientation and gender expression, more than half experienced physical harassment because of their sexual orientation and gender expression and more than a quarter experienced physical assault because of their sexual orientation and gender expression. These levels of victimization were higher than those faced

by the non-transgender lesbian, gay and bisexual students who participated in the 2007 National School Climate Survey, GLSEN's biennial survey of LGBT students.

In addition to looking at comparisons between transgender and non-transgender students, Harsh Realities specifically examines the experiences of the 295 transgender students who took the National School Climate Survey.

"Harsh Realities demonstrates the urgent need for educators, policymakers and all who care about safe schools to address the disproportionate victimization of transgender students and to improve the knowledge and understanding of all members of the school community about issues related to gender and gender expression," said GLSEN Executive Director Eliza Byard. "It is important to note, however, that in the face of extreme harassment, transgender students are resilient and taking the lead to bring up LGBT issues in school."

The high rate of victimization had a direct impact on school attendance and academic performance. Transgender students who experienced high levels of harassment were more likely to miss school because they felt unsafe and had lower grade point averages than those who experienced lower levels of harassment.

http://www.glsen.org/cgi-bin/iowa/all/news/record/2388.html

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Posted

I read about it yesterday. I will read the report and comment on it.

Gennee

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Posted

This is hardly news.

I mean, what's next? A headline that says, "The poor don't have enough money?"

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Posted

Yea it maybe old news or same ol same ol but the more it's written about and talked about among students and society the more focus on such hate and harassment will help society to learn and not be so judgemental.

Dee

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Posted

We can only hope it comes before the children have to suffer anylonger at the hands of the ignorant and intollerant, Their parents are partly to blame for this and we all know how hard it is to teach an old dog new tricks...... <_<

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Posted

I disagree. School is a place where parents cannot protect children from the bullying; it's hard to imagine anyone trying harder than my mom did, and yet this had no effect.

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Posted

I think that perhaps Shannon was refering to the parents of the children who are doing the bullying. I also believe that a lot of faculty are to blame for the bullying of children (and not just the trans ones). It is absolutely the responsibility of faculty to step in when bullying occurs, but many of them have there own predjudices and will gladly turn a blind eye to teasing. In some cases they even participate or actively engage in the bullying. I know this from other people I have talked to and my own experiences with a teacher in grade six. The world can be a cruel place, especially when you are powerless.

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