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Posted

A transgender man who was tried for the murder of his wife in 1920 in Sydney suffered a 'terrible injustice' says the author of a new book

28 February 2013 | By Anna Leach

" The story of a transgender man at the turn of the twentieth century in Australia - featuring running away to sea, a viscous rape at the discovery of his biological sex, an abandoned child, a new identity, marriage, murder and the most high-profile court trial of the decade - would make a riveting plot for a novel, but this is all part of the real life of Eugenia Falleni." --gaystarnews.com

The 'woman' who married two women in Edwardian Australia

It appears this book is not yet available in the U.S. It perhaps is not yet available outside of Australia.

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I almost didn't post this article because the interviewer and the interviewee continually referred to Harry/Eugene by the birth name given him by his parents, and with female pronouns (yeah, petty, I know. I guess I wasn't in the best of moods when I ran across this piece, but I came to my senses) - all despite the fact that the interviewee especially, recognized that Harry/Eugene was a transgender male. But even before the misuse of pronouns ticked me off, I almost didn't even clik on the link for this story since I was looking for stories on transpeople at the time - I thought this was an article about a [cisgender] lesbian based on the headline. But my curiosity got me 'cause it occurred to me that same-sex marriage isn't yet legal in Australia, and "woman" was in quotation marks. -Mike

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Posted

UPDATE ---

This book is now available on Amazon.com, and on BarnesandNoble.com

It appears that it is only available in digital form for Kindle and Nook on these two sites. It may be available on other websites in different formats.

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Posted

Mike, was deeply moved by the article and would like to read the book. Would his experience be different today? Yes, IF he got into the right support groups and websites, like TGGuide. Even today, I see people who never get the proper support. We have come a long way but have so far to go!

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Posted

Mike, was deeply moved by the article and would like to read the book. Would his experience be different today? Yes, IF he got into the right support groups and websites, like TGGuide. Even today, see people who never get the proper support. We have come a long ways but have so far to go!

I might get the book now that it's available. Problem is, it might end up on that digital stack over there in the corner. I have a Kindle for PC... and have actually purchased a few ebooks. One I've not even cracked open yet. One I started reading and in over a year's time, haven't finished!

I never much liked to read... :lol: ...and look where I am - on a forum!! Of couse some of the old regs know I'm not much of a reader. I don't hang in there very well with overly long posts, and sometimes I don't post on an article when I first see it if it's too long because I always feel like I have to read something thru before I bring it here and expect others will read it.

Turn a book into a video or movie though... and I'll jump on it... ;)

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Posted

I just added "Eugenia" to my Wishlist on Amazon. It looks fascinating but also so tragic. He looks very unhappy on the cover of the book.

Emma

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Posted

I just finished reading the book Eugenia: A True Story of Adversity, Tragedy, Crime and Courage. The book, for me, is rather long. But due to the adversity, tragedy, crime and courage, I hung with it and read it to the end despite the inclusion of what I consider to be the unnecessary brief histories of some of the characters involved in Eugene's trial. The only reason I trudged through those brief histories was in case there were references later in the book, for which I would have been confused or lost had I not read them.

Somewhere here on the board, I mentioned that I had been hesitant about getting and reading the book as I feared Eugene Falleni was referred to as female throughout the accounting of his life - after all, look at the title of the book. However, I discovered that the author decided to refer to Falleni appropriate to the identity that he/she assumed at any particular time during his/her life, or the identity assigned to Falleni by society at the time depending upon circumstances. Still, in my opinion, there areas in the book where I felt the author could have referred to Falleni as a man rather than not, or at least used "Falleni" instead of "Eugenia" where possible, if for no other reason than to show his respect and recognition of Falleni as a man. In other areas, though it was distressing to me, I understand why Falleni was referred to as a female.

Despite the tragedy Eugene endured during his life, and the fears he suffered, he did have a few happy moments. Being trans, it was easy to identify with him, and understand him.

Currently, the book is available in the U.S. only in digital form, and can be found both on Amazon and Barnes & Noble's websites, and may be available on other sites. While I wasn't too happy about paying a little over $10 for a DIGITAL book, at the end, I found the cost justifiable in that the story was worth it.

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