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Some books


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Posted

I was quite surprised to find Dr. Benjamin's The Transsexual Phenomenon online at http://www.mut23.de/...Phenomenon.pdf.

Although criticized for incomplete explanations of all the relevant medical science, I found these two books to be illuminating regarding the influences of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone upon the brain throughout our lives: The Female Brain at http://www.drlumd.co...emale-Brain.pdf and The Male Brain at

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Posted

Daneela , thank you for sharing that information . I'm a volunteer speaker here in Virginia for trans issues in doctor's offices and Nursing homes . These pieces will make a great addition to my collection of papers. ellen

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Piping in late, but I think that Dr. Benjamin's book is really worth reading, in spite of its age — it still remains relatively correct and is quite valuable from a historical perspective of what medical science thinks about transgenderity. Thanks also for the link for The Female Brain — I've added it to my list of things to read :)

To read about the subject from the perspective of sociology (and not psychology/psychiatry/other medical sciences), I personally loved Richard Ekins Male Femaling (available for an absurd price from Amazon — but with clever searching, you'll find a PDF of it on the Web for free as well). I did a thorough (albeit amateurish) review of the book on my own blog. It's refreshing to see the sociological approach to transgenderity, which is so different from what the medical sciences do. Ekins is also good at using a new kind of gender-neutral terminology, which is more encompassing than what we currently got, and absolutely 'political correct' (because it's new, it doesn't carry any negative bias). It's worth reading.

For (potential) social justice activists, a different perspective — this time from the social/political sciences — is brought to us by Sam Killermann, famous for his Genderbread Person diagram. His Social Justice Advocate's Handbook: A Guide to Gender explains social justice in a very hilarious way: he admits that he uses humour to explain what are quite serious issues, because it's more easy to understand that way (I certainly learned a lot!). You can get the book from its own site, where you have the option of paying for a paperback edition, or pay-as-much-as-you-want to get an eBook, or even just do a tweet to get it for free.

I would also recommend Jack Molay's A Creative Crossdreamer Vocabulary: Reflections on Transgender, which is a relatively interesting (and quite up-to-date) collection of short essays on transgender issues, from the perspective of the community, presented as a 'dictionary' — so it's useful as a reference. You can buy it (it's cheap and worth it) from Amazon.

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