Being Transgender May Be Hazardous

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Posted

Karen Kaplan | May 30, 2017, 8:00 AM
"Just under 66% of cisgender adults had a body mass index of at least 25, qualifying them as overweight. That may sound high, but it was significantly lower than the 72% share for the transgender adults."  --latimes.com

Being transgender in America may be hazardous to your health, study shows

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Posted

"Overall, the transgender people were younger, poorer, less white and more likely to be unemployed than their cisgender counterparts." 

This sentence has a profound relationship to the weight issues that the article doesn't really go into.  Eating right is insanely expensive in America, particularly in cities where access to local grown produce options isn't a thing.  I've seen the diets several of my friends had to arrange to be able to keep their families in food over the years.  Our food manufacturers have made huge profits off filling our food with supremely cheap junk, not to mention the 'poor shaming' people have when someone on assistance gets a nice piece of meat or other expensive (but healthy) choice.   The more a part of a group you are that is underemployed or unemployed, the more likely they are going to be existin gon a diet of this cheap, fatteing food to make ends meat.

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Posted

I agree with Briannah's point, it seems like socio-economic status was very likely a bigger factor across the board in terms of health impact than being transgender. It raises the question of why the sample they used was "younger, poorer, less white and more likely to be unemployed." One guess I have is how they sought out participants, that they may have mainly focused on community health service providers where they were more likely to find transgender people, and as a result the sampling of trans individuals was skewed.

I'm a little troubled that they didn't address this issue in the article. Whether it was that their sampling method caused the skewing, or that trans people do, on average, tend to be "younger, poorer, less white and more likely to be unemployed," it's a cause for concern.

Another point is that whenever you see a survey of trans people, it's much like it was with gay and lesbian people years ago, it skewed towards those who were willing to be open about it. So these might be interesting for conversation, but they will always be far from accurate until we live in a society where more/most trans people can live openly.

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