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  1. Often festival that are marketed as promoting tantra and conscious sexuality can have a very heterosexual ethos, talking about 'gender balanced' workshops and even asking people to identify as a 'man' or 'woman' - this festival was inspired by many people feeling they were not accepted into this space and even that they were being told they could not be spiritual, magical or tantric unless they 'sorted themselves out' - well here is the answer ....

    Coming in August 2014 in the UK
    An Exciting New Festival Of...
    Tantra Sexuality Spirituality Meditation
    Celebration Creativity Expression Love

    A festival that acknowledges and celebrates the diversity of humanity, that embraces the multiple possibilities of sexuality and physicality. A place that allows you to truly be yourself through expression, play, connection and openness. Perhaps even somewhere that you will discover what you have been seeking; what it is to be a divine human being on a planet of beauty and divinity...
    http://www.quintasensual.org/

    Please do give feedback as to the sorts of things you would love to see here and also please get in touch if you have something to offer (workshops, web design, graphics, publicity skills etc!)
  2. Recently, a hetero cisgender asked me the above question. I remembered questioning my relationship with J. As a hetero cisgender partner to a man who transitioned M2F, his transition caused me to question my own sexual preference. I struggled with societal views and judgments, and wondered how I would be perceived in the relationship if I stayed. I wondered what our sexual relationship would be like on the other side of J's transition. My comment to her question follows based on my own experience.

    If you are a heterosexual female, and "he" becomes "she" your sex life will change. You may find yourself in a lesbian sexual relationship. Do you wonder, like I did, that if you stay, and you find pleasure and satisfaction in your relationship with your partner if that means you are a lesbian? or, bisexual? I thought, maybe, I am simply, "bicapable".

    "Bicapable" is a term I coined to describe the relationship between an SO and "A PARTICULAR person (husband/partner) who transitions M2F. THIS partner whom you have established a sexual relationship with as a "he", and with whom you have a "HISTORY". I believe it is possible to have a gratifying sexual intimate relationship to each others mutual satisfaction, after "he" becomes "she" because you know and understand each others needs. At the same time, you know in yourself, that in any other circumstance, presented with a lesbian sexual encounter or relationship, that you would have no sexual interest. This is what I mean by "bicapable".

    So many variables make up one's own ability to enjoy being with another person in an intimate way.
    It is no one's business but that of the two of you with regard to how you express your sexual nature when together. In any relationship, it is the couple that defines what that is. Self-exploration, curiosity, and experimentation can go a long way to contributing to personal growth. And, I believe a relationship can grow and flourish if done with mutual respect, self-awareness, consent, and care for another person.

    My suggestion was to talk to her partner about her needs, likes, dislikes, fears, and to be honest, and sensitive to her partners needs as well. I said, "You might be surprised at what you discover about yourself, and your partner. Could you discover you are a lesbian? Maybe. But you may come to realize that by nature, you are not a lesbian, but with THIS person, in THIS relationship, you are bicapable. Thoughts?
  3. I remembered questioning my relationship with J. I am a hetero cisgender female, sharing my story with TG Guide members, and hope that you might find some support in your own situation from my post.

    Partner to J, a man who transitioned M2F,I found his coming out and then his transition caused me to question my own sexual preference. I struggled with societal views and judgments, and wondered how I would be perceived in the relationship if I stayed. I wondered what our sexual relationship would be like on the other side of J's transition M2F.

    If you are a heterosexual cisgender male, and "she" becomes "he" (F2M) your sex life will change. You may find yourself in a a homosexual/gay sexual relationship. Do you wonder, if you stay, and you still find pleasure and satisfaction in your relationship with your partner that it means you are a homosexual, gay, or, bisexual? In my own situation, I wondered, will that mean I am a lesbian? After much thought and angst, I concluded, maybe, I am simply, "bicapable".

    "Bicapable" is a term I coined to describe the relationship between an SO and "A PARTICULAR person (husband/wife/partner) who transitions M2F or F2M. THIS partner whom you have established a sexual relationship with as a "he or, as a she", and with whom you have a "HISTORY". I believe it is possible to have a gratifying sexual intimate relationship to each others mutual satisfaction, after "he transitions to female, or, she transitions to male" because you know and understand each others emotional and physical needs. At the same time, you know in yourself, that in any other circumstance, presented with a homosexual/gay sexual encounter or relationship, that you would have no sexual interest. This is what I mean by "bicapable".

    So many variables make up one's own ability to enjoy being with another person in an intimate way.
    It is no one's business but that of the two of you with regard to how you express your sexual nature when together. In any relationship, it is the couple that defines what that is. Self-exploration, curiosity, and experimentation can go a long way to contributing to personal growth. And, I believe a relationship can grow and flourish if done with mutual respect, self-awareness, consent, and care for another person.

    My suggestion is to talk to your partner about your needs, likes, dislikes, fears, and to be honest, and sensitive to your partners needs as well. You might be surprised at what you discover about yourself, and your partner. Could you discover you are a gay? Maybe. But you may come to realize that by nature, you are not gay, but with THIS person, in THIS relationship, you are bicapable. Thoughts?